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Gala Dinner - Salvador Dalí’s surrealist cookbook

Gala
Dinner

Salvador Dalí’s surrealist cookbook

Dalí. Les dîners de Gala

US$ 60
Edition: English
Availability: February 2019
  • “A surrealist, sensory treat.”

    — Metro, London
  • “Surrealist fans and kooky cooks will enjoy TASCHEN’s re-issue of Salvador Dalí’s 1973 cookbook, Les Dîners de Gala. Illustrated with Dalí’s bizarre, erotic work and dinner spreads shot in garish 1970s tones, this is a legitimate cookbook…”

    — theartnewspaper.com, London
  • “This is one for hedonists. It brims with Dali’s sumptuous, often phallic, illustrations and wry photographs of the mustachioed painter at his famous dinner parties… It’s unlike any other cookbook this year, or any other year, for that matter.”

    — The Times, London
  • “…a surrealist feast for the eyes, a kaleidoscope of weird, captivating, extraordinary, and mind-bending images, with recipes to match.”

    — The Boston Globe, Massachusetts
  • “Dali's surrealist cuisine was a bit like his surrealist art: The outlandish jokes and self-spoofing persona concealed tremendous technique.”

    — SAVEUR, New York
  • “It is a universal truth that great art, like great food, elevates everyday experience. But in 1973 Salvador Dalí went one step further with Les Dîners de Gala, which rocketed both disciplines at once into domestic dream realm… A cookbook like no other.”

    — British GQ, London
  • “Salvador Dalí’s exotic and imaginative cookbook, filled with the stuff your dreams (or possibly your nightmares) are made of.”

    — Metro.com, London
  • “A mammoth tome whose lustrous gold cover hints at decadence to come.”

    — Hyperallergic.com, New York
  • “…a bizarre work of edible art.”

    — foodandwine.com
  • “Food porn at its most gluttonous.”

    — Wired.com

Charles de Cordier

Brand & Retail Manager, Brussels
“Voluptuous and lavish. A culinary richness that takes us back to a lost era.”
Charles de Cordier
Illustration: Robert Nippoldt