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Gift Guide

Witch Pam Grossman recommends

Massimo Listri. Cabinet of Curiosities
If you want to get something truly marvelous for someone this season, you can do no better than this definitive book on wunderkammern - or cabinets of curiosities. Beginning in the 16th century, collectors of rare minerals, taxidermy creatures, finely detailed paintings, and exquisitely crafted objets d’art would juxtapose these seemingly disparate treasures together in rooms reserved exclusively for wonderment. In these gargantuan pages, you’ll find Massimo Listri’s stunning photographs of the most breathtaking collections still in existence throughout Europe, as well as essays and commentary by experts Giulia ML Carciotto and Antonio Paolucci. Perfect for those who “have it all,” as this book will prove that they most certainly do not!

Alchemy & Mysticism
Is alchemy the “science” of turning lead into gold? Or is it the art of transmuting the base materials of the self into a more refined, enlightened being? No matter the answer, there’s no doubt that the visuals of this esoteric practice are some of the most captivating ever created. Drawing from a deep well of mystical manuscripts and scientific illustrations, this book is an exhaustive and exhilarating compendium of alchemical imagery throughout history. Broken into themes such as “cosmic egg” and “chaos,” each section is replete with odd diagrams, secret codes, and prismatic drawings of animals, celestial bodies, and mysterious vessels. Sure to inspire and intrigue in equal measure, it’s a truly magnificent gift for the wide-eyed and golden-hearted.

Bosch. The Complete Works
Painter of nightmares and ecstasies, Hieronymus Bosch created some of the most wildly imaginative tableaux in art history. Each work of his is a maximalist masterpiece teeming with Biblical scenes, strange beasts, lush vegetation, and pastel nudes all writhing together in phantasmagorical frenzy. It’s the sort of imagery that one can spend days looking at and still discover something new – which also makes it notoriously difficult to duplicate. How fortunate then that we now have this painstakingly photographed, extra-large tome of his complete oeuvre - with dozens of enlarged detail shots - to pour over for as long as we wish.

The Book of Symbols. Reflections on Archetypal Images
The Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism (or ARAS) sounds made up, but it is a real-world Jungian library of pictorial archetypes that one can indeed visit in person. Are owls constantly appearing to you in your sleep? Do you keep finding yourself writing poems about rain? ARAS is the place to uncover what it all means, as it catalogs images by theme and offers symbolic analyses that span geography and time. Sounds rather dreamy, doesn’t it? Well this book is a portable - albeit 808 page - version of ARAS that anyone can now dip into. Organized alphabetically, each symbol’s entry contains writing about its historical and spiritual associations as well as splendid visual examples from across the globe. Readers can use it to interpret the signs and synchronicities in their lives – or generate new imagery to fuel their creative pursuits.

Dalí. Tarot
Tarot is having quite a moment, as many are rediscovering it as both a tool of spiritual inquiry and a magically tactile stack of art. Few decks are as glorious as this one though, as it was designed by the dazzling visionary himself, Salvador Dali. Sought after for years by collectors, this vividly reproduced set now allows for anyone to tap into his eccentric, insightful magic. Encased in gilded flocked violet, with an accompanying oversized full-color guidebook, these fantastical, delightfully madcap cards are sure to enchant art-lovers and mystic seekers alike.


Pam Grossman is a writer, curator, and teacher of magickal practice and history. She is the host of the podcast The Witch Wave, and the author of Waking the Witch. Reflections on Women, Magic, and Power. Her work has been featured in such outlets as The New York Times, The Atlantic, and Artforum.