Facebook Pixel
Main SR only Anker

James Baldwin. The Fire Next Time, Art Edition No. 1–50, Steve Schapiro ‘Martin Luther King Jr.’

Edition of 50
Black-and-white gelatin silver print, 7.9 x 12 in. on 11 x 14 in. paper; hardcover volume in a slipcase, letterpress-printed text, two different paper stocks, and tip-ins, 9.4 x 13.4 in., 272 pages
US$ 1,750
This edition is sold out. Please register on our waiting list so we can inform you if anything similar comes up.
All the grief, grit, and unassailable dignity of the civil rights movement are evoked in this Art Edition of James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time, published in letterpress alongside photographs by Steve Schapiro, and the signed print Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Selma, Alabama, 1965, a meditative study of the face of the movement.

Art Edition (No. 1–50), with the print Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Selma, Alabama (1965) signed by Steve Schapiro.

Winner of the 2017 Lucie Award, Book Publisher of the Year for a Limited Edition.

Nonviolence
or Nonexistence

Art Edition of The Fire Next Time with print of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Winner of the 2017 Lucie Award, Book Publisher of the Year for a Limited Edition.

First published in 1963, James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time stabbed at the heart of America’s so-called “Negro problem.” As remarkable for its masterful prose as it is for its frank and personal account of the black experience in the United States, it is considered one of the most passionate and influential explorations of 1960s race relations, weaving thematic threads of love, faith, and family into a candid assault on the hypocrisy of the “land of the free.”

This Art Edition presents James Baldwin’s rich, raw, and ever-relevant prose in letterpress alongside more than 100 photographs from Steve Schapiro, who traveled the American South with Baldwin for Life magazine. The encounter thrust Schapiro into the thick of the movement, allowing for vital, often iconic, images both of civil rights leaders—including Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, Fred Shuttlesworth, and Jerome Smith—and such landmark events as the March on Washington and the Selma March.

In this previously unpublished photograph from Steve Schapiro’s archives, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. listens to a sermon in Selma’s Brown Chapel AME Church before the historic voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery on March 21, 1965. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., a gifted orator and strategist, was hounded by the FBI and terrorized by segregationists. “In many of my photographs,” Schapiro says, “Dr. King seems to be looking into the crowd with concern, as if the many death threats he received daily might have credence at any moment.” Just three years later, terror prevailed when a bullet took his life in Memphis, Tennessee.

Marking the year of original publication, The Fire Next Time is limited to 1,963 copies in total, each signed by Steve Schapiro. Copies No. 1–50 come with the print Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Selma, Alabama (1965), also signed by Schapiro.

Also available as:
Art Edition (No. 51–100) with an alternative print, God Is Love, James Baldwin (1963).
Art Edition (No. 101–150) with an alternative print, March for Freedom, Selma to Montgomery (1965).
Collector’s Edition (No. 151–1,963).
The author

James Baldwin (1924–1987) was a novelist, essayist, playwright, poet, and social critic, and one of the most brilliant and provocative literary figures of the postwar era. His nonfiction collections, most notably Notes of a Native Son (1955) and The Fire Next Time (1963), and novels, including Giovanni’s Room (1956) and Another Country (1962), explore palpable yet unspoken intricacies of racial, sexual, and class distinctions in mid-20th-century America. A Harlem, New York, native, he primarily made his home in the south of France.

The photographer

American photojournalist Steve Schapiro has documented six decades of American culture, from the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. and the presidential campaign of Robert F. Kennedy to Andy Warhol’s Factory and the filming of The Godfather trilogy. He has published a dozen books of his photographs, has exhibited his work in shows from Los Angeles to Moscow, and is represented in the permanent collections of the Smithsonian Institution, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the J. Paul Getty Museum, among others.

The contributing authors

Congressman John Lewis (1940–2020) played a key role in the struggle to end segregation—as a Freedom Rider, the chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and an organizer of the March on Washington—and continued to serve as a prominent voice for social justice until the end of his life. He was the recipient of the Lincoln Medal, the John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Lifetime Achievement Award, and the NAACP Spingarn Medal, among many other honors.

Gloria Karefa-Smart was born Gloria Esther Baldwin in Harlem. She traveled widely with her brother James and is the literary executor of his estate. She has lived in Freetown, Sierra Leone; New York’s Upper West Side; and Washington, D.C., where she still resides, and is the mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother of 22.

Marcia Davis is the news editor of The Marshall Project. A native of St. Louis, she spent more than 20 years as an editor and writer at The Washington Post, where she helped lead the coverage of the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri, after the fatal shooting of Michael Brown in 2014. She also worked at the Minneapolis Star Tribune and was senior editor of Emerge magazine.

James Baldwin.
The Fire Next Time, Art Edition No. 1–50, Steve Schapiro ‘Martin Luther King Jr.’
Edition of 50
Black-and-white gelatin silver print, 7.9 x 12 in. on 11 x 14 in. paper; hardcover volume in a slipcase, letterpress-printed text, two different paper stocks, and tip-ins, 9.4 x 13.4 in., 272 pages
James Baldwin.
The Fire Next Time, Art Edition No. 1–50, Steve Schapiro ‘Martin Luther King Jr.’
Edition of 50
US$ 1,750